Possibility of a DUI charge could be higher over holiday weekends

Yet another holiday was upon us recently, and many Michigan residents probably celebrated by wearing something green to work or even going out for a green beer at happy hour. St. Patrick's Day celebrations seem to get bigger every year, with several major cities even having parades on the annual day to celebrate Irish heritage. However, just as automatic as it might seem to wear green on this lighthearted holiday, it is just as automatic these days for law enforcement officials to increase drunk driving patrols.

Law enforcement agencies throughout Michigan joined in on these increased patrols, which pop up mostly around holidays, such as New Year's Eve and St. Patrick's Day, when people who don't normally drink alcohol may be inclined to go out for a celebratory beverage or two. Most people probably won't argue with tipping back a green beer, but driving afterward is what can really land a Michigan resident in some hot water.

And, according to a recent article, the ramp-up to St. Patrick's Day celebrations was just the beginning of a heavily increased patrol window throughout over 20 counties in Michigan. The article indicated that many agencies are actually extending the increased patrols through the beginning of April - all in an effort to curb driving while intoxicated.

Having fun with friends and family members on any holiday can be fun, but the fun will end if a DUI charge is the end result of the celebrations. Our readers should remember that .08 is the legal limit for a driver's blood alcohol content level in Michigan - a limit that can be reached pretty quickly for most people. And, if a driver's BAC level is .17 or higher, Michigan's "Super Drunk" law could come into play - along with its increased penalties.

Source: UpNorthLive.com, "Police pick up patrols to fight against drunk driving," Roxanne Werly, March 13, 2014

Categories: Articles

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