Sex crimes case results in plea deal for Michigan man

A Michigan man recently received a much lighter sentence than he was originally looking at thanks to a plea bargain which was successfully negotiated with Washtenaw County authorities.Originally facing four sex crime charges of possession of child sexually abusive material, the 67-year-old man instead pleaded guilty to one of the charges while the remaining three were dismissed. As part of the plea agreement, he will serve a probation term of five years, during which time he will not be allowed to use a computer.Sex crimes often have very particular requirements attached to any sentences that are handed down by the court, sometimes including intensive therapy, signing up on the sex offender registry, GPS tracking devices or restrictions on the use of electronics, such as in this recent case.When someone is accused of committing sex crimes, the damage to their personal and professional lives is almost immediate. Besides facing the prospect of an extended prison sentence, many have to deal with the immediate and ongoing damage to their reputation.The details in this recent case disclosed the steps of an intense federal and state investigation, which could have led to a criminal trial involving computer forensics and aggressive prosecution. Had this individual gone to trial, he most likely would have faced a far more severe sentence if he had been found guilty of all of the charges. The police reports indicated that a computer, as well as several cameras with digital storage tapes, was found in the man's home.When dealing with allegations of sex crimes, the defense strategy can be the most crucial aspect of the case. Sometimes that means vigorously fighting the charges in open court, other times that means seeking the best deal in plea negotiations. This man's strategy opted for the latter, but his defense team has expressed hope that the computer restriction could be modified down the road.Source: AnnArbor.com, "Former Scout leader sentenced to 5 years probation for possessing child pornography," John Counts, July 28, 2012
Categories: Articles

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